Do addicts have to hit rock bottom?

Do addicts have to hit rock bottom?

      Many addicts live on the bottom, for others the rock bottom is Death 
Waiting to hit bottom is a myth

Waiting for an addict to hit rock bottom 
- is a myth
      Enabling an addict to use comfortably keeps them from finding
their emotional bottom and hurts the family and loved ones much more
      Enabling is providing an active addict with a car, a phone, housing, bail money, or an attorney to set them free to continue using 
Standing in the path of natural and logical consequences.  
Treatment is not enabling a person to use


Addiction Treatment clears the mind
Can bring Rock Bottom
Where a decision can be made 
Addiction Treatment 
can bring rock bottom 
Treatment Centers to get away from the drugs & away from the negative support group. People start to hear about hope and grace. At some point intelligence can return. Sanity resurfaces and a clear decision can be made.
The power that gives a person long term recovery is the ability to develop a deep understanding of the truth about addiction recovery.  

The decision to change, become humble, and stay clean no matter what. Has to be made everyday, one day at a time, for as long as you want to stay clean. 

Being of Service to others 
The only way to replace the thrill of addiction that is burning in one's psyche, is to humbly give service to others. This can take many forms. It takes therapy time and brain chemistry stabilization time to really understand this concept on a gut level. It can be done. Hundreds of thousands of clean addicts are living this way all over the globe.

If you can't believe this can work for you. 
Just believe that it is working for us and feel better. 

One man's story of pain,   

to Olympic Hopeful, 
to Prison, 
to Addiction Treatment 
to Recovery & a life of Service

For the past 28 years my life was centered on me, myself, and I.
It was based on pride, self-seeking and denial.
I was caught up in a world of self-destruction.
I blamed my pitiful condition and constant returns to prison on anything but me.

I Born in 1964, by a woman who left me at the age of 2 and my sister age 1 at Orangewood Children's Home. We were eventually given into the custody of my step-father, who happened to be my sister’s Biological Father.

He raised us in what we called a Barrio, in Anaheim. As a child, I remember being exposed to sexual content, was sexually molested by a female cousin, and one of the boys from the neighborhood, I was abused physically, mentally, and emotionally. 

Not all was bad, I was given the opportunity to get involved with athletics, and I excelled in boxing. This was my outlet from all the chaos that was going on at home. 

My Father was an addict, and I guess he loved me in the best way he knew how. 

At the age of 13, well into getting prepared for the 1980 Olympics, my arm was broken. Little did I know at the time, that if it wasn't for that freak accident, I wouldn't be writing this. 

After boxing, I had to find something else to help me not have to be around home. I found myself gravitating to those outside influences, the kids around the
neighborhood, and at school. 

Smoked my first cigarette, and a joint of marijuana at 13, and started getting involved with gang activity. When my father found out of these things he got upset, but didn't stop me. 

He started to allow me to have friends over, and let us drink and party at home. My first arrest was at 13. 
I was always trying to fit in, wanting to be accepted. I would see the older guys from the neighborhood, and how they had the respect of those around us. 

So I started hanging out with them...I wanted to be one of the “Big Boys.” 
Not knowing that what started out as fun, would turn into a dangerous journey of twists and turns of self-destruction, up and downs...a rollercoaster ride with no end. 

I was taught about the definition of a man
These rules were my rights of passage into manhood. 
   1. Don't let anyone bully you
   2. The man who makes the most money gets the most girls
   3. If you go to jail you got respect.

Within matter of two years, I found myself strung out on heroin
My first “fix” was in a shack in the backyard. 
That started me on my quest of heartache and misery. 
My habit turned into an addiction that would have me believing everything was fine...I don't have a problem. 
Boy was I wrong and confused! I knew deep down that something wasn't right. My inner man was crying out.
Do addicts have to hit rock bottom?

I started doing crimes, and running away from home. Again when my father found out, He figured, it was better to let me do it at home, that way he knew I was ok. This was not a good thing, because He was selling heroin, and would give it to me to sell for him. 

At 18 yrs old I chose to go to prison. You can say it was something I welcomed, because for me that was becoming a man of respect. 

This went on for 30 years, twenty-three of those years I was incarcerated. 
Just like I did at 13, I was still looking to be accepted, so I got involved in the prison life style. 

By this time I had no idea of who I was, I was so lost in trying to be someone I thought I wanted to be, it didn't matter where I was, or what each day presented.
I was going to be accepted one-way or another. 
Before I knew it, I became institutionalized. 

The life I was choosing  to live, took my children away, robbed me of my adolescence, my identity, my freedom. 
In 2007 it almost took my life. I was arrested, and was charged under the
Calif. three-strike law. Looking at 25 yrs to life, I had to make a decision. 

I hit my knees and asked my God for deliverance. This is the response I got...I had two choices; 
   1) I could continue to try to be “that guy”, and spend the rest of my life in prison,          
         or 
   2.) I could give my life to Him and be free. I chose the latter. 
Addiction Treatment 
can bring rock bottom emotionally 

While incarcerated for this last time, I was given the opportunity to go
through “Our House”, an in custody Substance Abuse Program in San Luis Obispo. It was fashioned under the Therapeutic Community Model. 

Well there, I discovered the “real me”
For the first time in my life, I thought of being free of my addiction, having peace of mind, of being successful, and staying out of prison. 

I started to learn about my emotions and my “twisted thinking patterns", as well as my destructive cycles of behavior. 

I learned to trust myself, to be open to change. I begin to realize that I was no longer enslaved to the institutional mentality I had been guided by for so long. 

The process of change liberated me

Being of Service to others

It was also during this period that I started my education in the field of recovery. I realized my purpose for living, was to help those that have suffered the same as I have, and the youth of today. 

I was released April 8, 2009, and started to be a responsible and accountable member of our society.

I am a student at Saddleback College, working on my certificates in Drug and Alcohol, and Criminal Justice. Once completed, my intention is to work on a Bachelors Degree, then continue education towards a Masters in Child Psychology. 

I am an active member of NA, with four years clean on March 8, 2011, and I work for a treatment center in San Clemente. I was a house manager for Sober-living for a year, and today I rent my own apt. I have been a speaker for Martine Wehr’s youth and law class, (Juvenile Consulting Services, LLC ), and at The Bright Program, sponsored by UCLA. I've spoken at various Orange County Juvenile facilities, and Orange County Drug Court events. 

I am so honored when I see a flash of recognition in the faces of the youth I am so privileged to be addressing.  I see some of them identify, and truly hear what I am saying. I get to let them know there is another, better way to live, and it can be within their reach. 

My life has been filled with blessings and miracles since making that fateful decision to change back in 2007. 

To be able to share my experiences in hope 
that it would help someone is my greatest prayer and hope

Do addicts have to hit rock bottom?
Can that bottom be hit emotionally with their intelligence?
Addiction Treatment has provided the 
bottom needed for many recovering addicts  
We can help you find a rehab that will work with your insurance or price range
Call 949-292-2000    or text   949-413-4109


Please share this story to facebook or Google+
Make a comment in the comment area below 
Insurance VerificationInsurance Verification